Supply Line Organic Foods
  Top » Catalog » Whole Grains/wheat/etc » 60983 My Account  |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout   
Categories
Baking supplies (20)
Bean and Soup mixes (12)
Beans, peas, (35)
Beverages (1)
Bulk Teas (14)
Coconut--oils, milk & sugar (11)
Corn Organic (4)
Dried fruit--and snacks (33)
Dried Herbs and Spices Organic-> (66)
Dried Vegetables-- Sea Vegetable (4)
Eden canned beans (10)
Farmer Direct ( Gabriola) (1)
Farmer direct (Vancouver Island) (11)
Farmers markets (8)
Flours-> (15)
Gluten free (10)
Grains Processed--Specialty (6)
Granolas & Muesl ^ 7 grain cerea (15)
Hemp products (5)
Nut butters (6)
Nutritional Yeast (3)
Oats (12)
Oils & Vinegars (1)
Olives/Olive oil (1)
Pastas (11)
Popcorn (4)
Produce (1)
Rice (17)
Sea Salt (4)
Seeds and Nuts (46)
Specialty flours (83)
Sprouting Mixes (15)
Sweeteners (4)
Tomato and pasta sauce
Treats
Whole Grains/wheat/etc (46)
Manufacturers
Information
About Us
Our Mission
How it Works
FAQ
Privacy Notice
Conditions of Use
Contact Us
Links
Quinoa Grain, Black 5 kg, Organic
[60983]
$71.50

Organic-- Bolivia-- Quinoa Spanish quinua, from Quechua kinwa), a species of goosefoot (Chenopodium), is a grain-like crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, or grain, as it is not a member of the grass family. As a chenopod, quinoa is closely related to species such as beets, spinach, and tumbleweeds. Its leaves are also eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like amaranth, but the commercial availability of quinoa greens is currently limited.Quinoa originated in the Andean region of South America, where it has been an important food for 6,000 years. Its name is the Spanish spelling of the Quechua name. Quinoa is generally undemanding and altitude-hardy, so it can be easily cultivated in the Andes up to about 4,000 meters. Even so, it grows best in well-drained soils and requires a relatively long growing season. In eastern North America, it is susceptible to a leaf miner that may reduce crop success; this leaf miner also affects the common weed and close relative Chenopodium album, but C. album is much more resistant.The Incas, who held the crop to be sacred, referred to quinoa as chisaya mama or mother of all grains, and it was the Inca emperor who would traditionally sow the first seeds of the season using 'golden implements'. During the European conquest of South America quinoa was scorned by the Spanish colonists as food for Indians, and even actively suppressed, due to its status within indigenous non-Christian ceremonies. In fact, the conquistadors forbade quinoa cultivation for a time and the Incas were forced to grow corn instead. needed. Quinoa was of great nutritional importance in pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, being secondary only to the potato, and was followed in importance by maize. In contemporary times, this crop has become highly appreciated for its nutritional value, as its protein content is very high (12%�18%). Unlike wheat or rice (which are low in lysine), and like oats, quinoa contains a balanced set of essential amino acids for humans, making it an unusually complete protein source among plant foods. It is a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron. Quinoa is gluten-free and considered easy to digest. Because of all these characteristics, quinoa is being considered a possible crop in NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System for long-duration manned spaceflights. Quinoa in its natural state has a coating of bitter-tasting saponins, making it unpalatable. Most quinoa sold commercially in North America has been processed to remove this coating. Some have speculated this bitter coating may have caused the Europeans who first encountered quinoa to reject it as a food source, since they adopted other indigenous food plants of the Americas like maize and potatoes. This bitterness has beneficial effects during cultivation, as the plant is unpopular with birds and thus requires minimal protection. There have been attempts to lower the saponin content of quinoa through selective breeding to produce sweeter, more palatable varieties. However, when new varieties were developed by agronomists, native growers in the high plateau rejected the new varieties despite their high projected yields; because the seeds no longer had a bitter coating, birds had consumed the entire crop after just one season. The saponins in quinoa can be mildly toxic, as can be the oxalic acid in the leaves of all the Chenopodium family. Reports of numbness of the lips and tongue have been reported after eating cooked but unwashed quinoa. The risks associated with quinoa are minimal, provided it is properly prepared and leaves are not eaten to excess.

This product was added to our catalog on Saturday 11 January, 2014.
 Reviews 
Shopping Cart more
0 items
What's New? more
Coconut Milk Powder, Organic, 400 g *(P)
Coconut Milk Powder, Organic, 400 g *(P)
$15.40

Copyright © 2019 Supply Line Organic Foods
Powered by osCommerce

Thst for banner